As more states legalize cannabis, the state of Nevada hopes to be a pioneer in medical marijuana education and research. The University of Nevada Reno recently established an inter-disciplinary Cannabis Research Initiative with $3 million from the National Institutes for Drug Abuse.

High hopes for UNR cannabis education program

High-hopes-for-UNR-cannabis-education-program

 

RENO, Nev. (FOX 11/News 4) – The University of Nevada, Reno’s Extended Studies department has high aspirations for its new cannabis education program.

The four separate certificates will be offered as part of the fully online courses to assist students in landing jobs in the burgeoning marijuana industry.

“The one thing I believe we’ve seen with COVID is that individuals have lost their jobs. People have discovered that they may choose to pursue an entirely other professional path “UNR Extended Studies interim vice provost Jozi Herzik remarked. “This is an excellent opportunity. They’re also very lucrative occupations.”

According to the program’s website, skilled worker earnings in the cannabis business are 11% more than the national average median wage.

The following are the four certifications available:

  1. Certificate in Cannabis Medicine and Healthcare
  2. Certificate in Cannabis Law and Policy
  3. Certificate in Cannabis Business
  4. Certificate in Cannabis Agriculture and Horticulture

According to a forecast issued earlier this year, cannabis sales will reach a new high of $17.5 billion in 2020, up 46 percent from 2019, and the business will generate over 250,000 new employment.

Before complete recreational legalization in 2016, Nevada was the third state to allow cannabis for medicinal use in 1998.

And now, with cannabis lounges on the horizon, Herzik believes it’s the ideal moment to launch a marijuana education program.

“The response has been incredible,” she remarked. “We’ve had a lot of queries and curiosity from students.”

Despite the fact that marijuana is legal in Nevada, the institution anticipated greater opposition.

“We did expect that,” Herzik added, “but only because there is a bad connotation associated with cannabis.” “At the federal level, it is still prohibited. As a result, we’re a little sensitive about it.”

She emphasized that these seminars are strictly informational, with no product sample or real marijuana production.

Despite the fact that the school is online, Herzik claims that many of the students are from Nevada, and that cannabis industry owners are enthusiastic.

It’s a collaboration between UNR’s Extended Studies and the Green Flower organization. They specialize in cannabis education and training all across the nation.

UNR will be the 13th institution to join Green Flower as a partner.

According to Herzik, planning a new program generally takes a year, but this one was completed in only six months.

“Cannabis is exceedingly sophisticated and heavily regulated,” said Green Flower CEO Max Simon. “As a result, anyone who wish to work in the cannabis industry, which is a rapidly rising industry, must be well-trained. Otherwise, they won’t have a chance.”

According to Simon, the programs created by his organization make graduating students significantly more employable in the sector.

Nevada’s cannabis sector is rapidly expanding. There’s also a lot of room for expansion in the future.

The program will begin on November 15th. Each credential takes six months to complete and costs little about $3,000 in total. Those who enroll in the first batch will get a $500 discount.

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